App-eal

Washington & Lee '16 (Meera)
University of Pennsylvania '17 (kittalee)
Pomona '18 (Val)
~ Saturday, July 5 ~
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Updated Stats Page

Hope everyone’s been doing well! Good luck to all those receiving AP scores - feel free to brag in the ask box :)

P.S. There’s a boy!!!!!

Tags: he's very cute val makes a post
2 notes
~ Thursday, July 3 ~
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Anonymous said: Hello! I will be taking the SATs in my junior year (2015-2016) and I'm wondering whether the changes will affect when I take them. If I take them in 2015 and 2016 will the tests be different? NbuAny ideas?

According to the CollegeBoard website, the redesigned SAT will be implemented Spring 2016, specifically March 2015. I’m guessing if you take it fall 2015 the old SAT will still be used, and that’s what the site seems to imply.

also wow I’m old now

Good luck with your studying! You have plenty of time though—like plenty—so enjoy your summer and all :)

-kittalee


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Anonymous said: Hey :) I'm an international student who has a question about olympiads. I noticed that under her stats kittalee place "Science Olympiad Participant". Is this something that colleges respond to positively even if you don't place? At my school, almost half of us partake in olympiads because it's sort of compulsory. How would I best phrase my involvement on my Common App? Thank you very much :)

I placed my freshman and sophomore years, but because my school’s team sucks we didn’t make it state junior or senior year (lol). I put my medals from freshman and sophomore year on the common app, but then didn’t really mention any other involvement in Science Olympiad. If you have other activities that you were move involved in and placed in, put those first; the Common App lets you do 10 (last I checked) activities, in order of their ‘importance.’ For you, if you want to fill up that list, then go ahead and put science olympiad somewhere near the middlebottomy.

-kittalee


~ Wednesday, July 2 ~
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~ Sunday, June 29 ~
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picturesfrombeyond said: I'm a high school student and I *really* want to work at NPR once I'm done with college. What should I be doing now to prepare myself?

npr:

Enjoy college. Enjoy life. Do things outside your comfort zone. Everyone here took a different path. People change. What you want now might not be what you want in five years. Explore all of your options. Leave your mind open. Write and read and experience as many things as you can. This is true for any path in life, not just working here. (I’ll stop the zen for a sec: we have an internship program.) But seriously: just do as much as you can and meet as many different types of people as you can. College is short. Too short. Worry about us later. 

Tags: :)
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~ Saturday, June 28 ~
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(Source: dribbblepopular)


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~ Thursday, June 19 ~
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Anonymous said: so if i get a scholarship, and they say that i can only use it on school expenses, can i just buy a bunch of books on barnes and noble and consider that a school expense? like if i have extra money. or can that money be used on food?

I think generally most scholarships will leave it up to you to determine what constitutes a school expense, but maybe check in with whoever is providing the scholarship?


~ Tuesday, June 17 ~
Permalink Tags: college costs college application questbridge
3 notes
~ Saturday, June 7 ~
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:)

:)

Tags: me pomona graduation val makes a post
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~ Thursday, June 5 ~
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I graduate today!

:)

I’ll post pictures later!

Tags: val makes a post
4 notes
~ Saturday, May 31 ~
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Anonymous said: What schools did you end up getting into Val?

Stanford, Pomona, Amherst, Bowdoin, Kenyon, UC Berkeley, UCLA, UC Davis, UCSD


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Anonymous said: if i take ap studio art in senior year with a teacher who i've had a class with in my junior, can a rec letter from her count as one of my two academic rec letters?

If that junior year class was an academic class, then yes!


~ Wednesday, May 28 ~
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sinidentidades:

Poet and Author Maya Angelou Dies at Age 86
Famed poet and author Maya Angelou died this morning in North Carolina. She was 86.
"She’d been very frail and had heart problems, but she was going strong, finishing a new book," Angelou’s agent Helen Brann told ABC News. "I spoke to her yesterday. She was fine, as she always was. Her spirit was indomitable."
Angelou recently canceled an appearance at the 2014 MLB Beacon Awards Luncheon, where she will be honored. Major League Baseball cited “health reasons” Friday in saying the 86-year-old won’t make it to the May 30 event in Houston before the annual Civil Rights Game, the Associated Press reported last Friday.
"Her family is extremely grateful that her ascension was not belabored by a loss of acuity or comprehension. She lived a life as a teacher, activist, artist and human being. She was a warrior for equality, tolerance and peace. The family is extremely appreciative of the time we had with her and we know that she is looking down upon us with love," Angelou’s son Guy Johnson said in a statement.
Born Marguerite Annie Johnson in St. Louis, Angelou worked a number of jobs before publishing her first book, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” which focused on her own life, in 1969.
Nominated for a National Book Award, the tome skyrocketed Angelou to national fame — especially given the controversial nature of several sections, which dealt with child molestation, racism, and sexuality.
"I thought that it was a mild book. There’s no profanity," Angelou told AP. "It speaks about surviving, and it really doesn’t make ogres of many people. I was shocked to find there were people who really wanted it banned, and I still believe people who are against the book have never read the book."
After the success of her first book, Angelous wrote the screenplay and score for the 1972 film, “Georgia, Georgia,” becoming the first African-American woman to author a screenplay that was filmed. It was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.
She would go on to write more than 30 published works, including five more memoirs and many books of poetry.
Beloved by stars, Angelou was a mentor to Oprah Winfrey and favorite of many presidents. She spoke at the inauguration of President Bill Clinton and was awarded the Presidential Medal of the Arts in 2000. In 2011, President Barack Obama honored her with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
Last November, ABC News spoke with Angelou, who lived in in Winston-Salem because of her longtime teaching job at Wake Forest University.
"I’m learning that I have patience and that patience is a great gift," she said. "I know that people only do what they know to do. Not what they say they know, not what they think they should know. … People do only what they know how to do, so I have patience. I pray that people will have patience with themselves and learn more."

sinidentidades:

Poet and Author Maya Angelou Dies at Age 86

Famed poet and author Maya Angelou died this morning in North Carolina. She was 86.

"She’d been very frail and had heart problems, but she was going strong, finishing a new book," Angelou’s agent Helen Brann told ABC News. "I spoke to her yesterday. She was fine, as she always was. Her spirit was indomitable."

Angelou recently canceled an appearance at the 2014 MLB Beacon Awards Luncheon, where she will be honored. Major League Baseball cited “health reasons” Friday in saying the 86-year-old won’t make it to the May 30 event in Houston before the annual Civil Rights Game, the Associated Press reported last Friday.

"Her family is extremely grateful that her ascension was not belabored by a loss of acuity or comprehension. She lived a life as a teacher, activist, artist and human being. She was a warrior for equality, tolerance and peace. The family is extremely appreciative of the time we had with her and we know that she is looking down upon us with love," Angelou’s son Guy Johnson said in a statement.

Born Marguerite Annie Johnson in St. Louis, Angelou worked a number of jobs before publishing her first book, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” which focused on her own life, in 1969.

Nominated for a National Book Award, the tome skyrocketed Angelou to national fame — especially given the controversial nature of several sections, which dealt with child molestation, racism, and sexuality.

"I thought that it was a mild book. There’s no profanity," Angelou told AP. "It speaks about surviving, and it really doesn’t make ogres of many people. I was shocked to find there were people who really wanted it banned, and I still believe people who are against the book have never read the book."

After the success of her first book, Angelous wrote the screenplay and score for the 1972 film, “Georgia, Georgia,” becoming the first African-American woman to author a screenplay that was filmed. It was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.

She would go on to write more than 30 published works, including five more memoirs and many books of poetry.

Beloved by stars, Angelou was a mentor to Oprah Winfrey and favorite of many presidents. She spoke at the inauguration of President Bill Clinton and was awarded the Presidential Medal of the Arts in 2000. In 2011, President Barack Obama honored her with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Last November, ABC News spoke with Angelou, who lived in in Winston-Salem because of her longtime teaching job at Wake Forest University.

"I’m learning that I have patience and that patience is a great gift," she said. "I know that people only do what they know to do. Not what they say they know, not what they think they should know. … People do only what they know how to do, so I have patience. I pray that people will have patience with themselves and learn more."


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Anonymous said: Hey kittalee and Val, who I know are wonderful aspiring writers, do you guys have any tips on where I should look for feedback on my writing? I have been writing (non college admissions-related pieces) lately and I deffo want some people to look over it.

That’s wonderful that you’ve been writing! I’d recommend looking for a teacher you have a good relationship with or a friend who likes to read. If you’re interested in publishing, there are several online literary magazines that you could submit to - getting your piece accepted to publish is a kind of feedback in itself! (Winter Tangerine review is one of these.) I hope this helps even a little and please write back if you have more questions!


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Anonymous said: I'm going entering my senior year next year and I just started to get serious about grades, could I still get a scholarship with just good grades in the senior year?

Sure, it could happen! Definitely still worth applying :) There are usually other things considered for scholarship apps like essays etc.